What are the most common novice mistakes?

Just found I exposed .git folder on some projects.

http://www.jamiembrown.com/blog/one-in-every-600-websites-has-git-exposed/

What are other common novice mistakes?

Not taking the time to learn and understand the underlying tools/software you build on top of.

not useful man.

IMO Key to make Sage grow is not scaring newbies away.

Why is suggesting taking time to learn tools you are actively using “not useful”? I don’t think Scott was trying to be rude.

We encourage the tools Roots uses because we think they help with development. Everyone has the ability to choose which projects they want to use. But if you want to use a project that is utilizing Composer or gulp, or Ansible, why wouldn’t you want to learn how the tool actually works?

Just as an example, if you aren’t interested in learning gulp.js, or Bower, then in my opinion, there isn’t much reason to use Sage. If you want the theme wrapper only then that is easy enough to add to any theme.

This I learned:

To keep up with sage development and not get lost:

Use git branches always:
-Git branch to make your own sage-custom
-Git branch from your sage-custom for every project

To publish use gulp --production

Don’t publish assets folder, node_modules or anything starting with a dot

Don’t mix functionality on sage that could exist on a wordpress plugin

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You’re right.

It’s just that these (great) tools take time to be mastered. In the process we fall in the same newbie mistakes.

Some are harmless, some can make people lose their job like the one I pointed on the link

I never said anything about mastering tools. I just said to take some time to learn/understand them which is much different. It’s often enough to figure out at a base level how something works/the concepts behind it.

Mastery of any skill/tool takes a lot of time. However, that’s no excuse not to spend a bit of time learning/understanding it though.

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That is precisely why I like about this project.

It uses multiple good technologies and good practices.

For some, is a gate into knowing those tools for the first time.

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I am a designer, first, and a front-end developer, second. I found Sage (at that time, Roots) and loved it because of it’s flexibility and a platform for me to express my creativity without having to rewire pre-built themes.

What started out as a designer’s blank canvas, so to speak, turned into an opportunity to learn, practice and apply modern development techniques that not only made it easier and faster to deploy WP sites, but also freed up more time for me to explore design.

Sage and the entire Roots system is definitely a challenge to master but I have working knowledge of most of the concepts and have been able to see a measurable increase in my efficiency.

I appreciate the Roots team’s dedication to continuously integrating tools as they are released because as Roots (and Sage) gets better and faster, so do I.

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Like you all Sage has introduced me to a number of new tools (BrowserSync is so cool) that make designing a site so much easier. Being a novice myself, Sage provides a tested, logical workflow that I can learn and adapt for my own work.

I’d also add that the principle of DRY has really got me thinking as I redesign my website. It’s a good reminder to organize your projects in a way that makes it easy to understand, modify, and expand.

Customizing the lib stuff was a bit unorthodox for me as a first time Sage user. I’ve found the tooling used by the theme superb but tooling is always challenging in today’s front-end world: it changes so fast.

In the future, I would put more examples in the documentation. Everything there makes sense but it always helps to see more of the code before you jump in.